Author Topic: i need road tires for my 29-er mountain bike... (Read 19035 times)

FuckRx

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i need road tires for my 29-er mountain bike...
« on: April 23, 2014, 11:08:25 AM »

i've been searching and can't find any tires for my 29-er mountain bike. it's my commuter bike and it's doing great but i have had the bike for over 5 years, the tires are wearing and even though admittedly i don't need to replace them i think it will help with my commute.
the local bike shop has them for $45 each, 90 for the pair. seems a little steep. i get most of my other things from them but wanted to know if i can perhaps get a better deal.
thanks

jp

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Re: i need road tires for my 29-er mountain bike...
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2014, 11:18:18 AM »
google turned up several results for less than that, half that actually. I guess it depends if you want a specific brand. You are probably going to pay more at your bike shop even for a specific brand, but some people (not me) think it is worth it to support a local shop and build a relationship with the bike shop.

Anyway, here are some road tires for a 29er for $22: http://outsideoutfitters.com/p-24646-wtb-slick-29er-tires.aspx?variantID=74301&gclid=CNrHqK-O970CFc9AMgodYDQA3g

Thegoblinchief

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Re: i need road tires for my 29-er mountain bike...
« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2014, 11:52:33 AM »
$45 each isn't bad, but you can probably find a quality tire for $30 each.

Before you replace them, read this article:

http://sheldonbrown.com/tyres.html

I thought my tires needed replacing, but after reading that, I think they are good for a while longer.

If you do order online, make sure you buy the correct size. "29er" isn't specific enough.
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Jomar

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Re: i need road tires for my 29-er mountain bike...
« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2014, 02:00:47 PM »
29er wheels are the same diameter as 700s, so you can use a wider 700c tire no problem. 700X35 or wider tires should do the trick. You should be able to find them for under 15 bucks, if you don't care about durability or flat-proofness. In my opinion it's worth it to spend the cash on more expensive tires like Schwalbe Marathons, Vittoria Randoneurs, or Continental Touring Pluses. They will last waYYY longer and will be less likely to flat (especially Schwalbe Marathon Pluses). Just my two cents.

skyrefuge

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Re: i need road tires for my 29-er mountain bike...
« Reply #4 on: April 23, 2014, 02:41:53 PM »
You do not have a "29er".

You have a bike with 700C wheels, which is the most common bike to have. Tires that fit it are the easiest thing in the world to find, and as cheap as you want them.

"29er" is nothing more than a marketing term invented by the evil geniuses at bike companies (who would have guessed people working at bike companies could be so evil?!?) to trick people into paying a shitload of money for a "29er" tire that is actually no different than a standard tire. The bike industry is really quite shameless with these "inventions" coming every couple years (every time I see someone who got tricked into buying a fatbike, which seems to be the latest scam, I can't decide whether I want to punch them in the face or just laugh at them).

If the guys at your bike shop didn't point you to their wide selection of 700C tires, then they're dicks who are in on the scam too (or shamefully ignorant), and you shouldn't feel bad about taking your business elsewhere.

From $17/tire: http://universalcycles.com/shopping/index.php?category=590&order=price_asc# Like Jomar said, something in the 700x35C - 700x38C range is likely to work, depending on the actual width of your rims (the width is the one thing that distinguishes "29er" rims from "road bike" rims, but there is a continuous range of available rim-widths, so dividing them with names like that is pointless and obfuscates actual useful information. Argh, fuck the bike industry!)

infogoon

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Re: i need road tires for my 29-er mountain bike...
« Reply #5 on: April 23, 2014, 02:55:22 PM »
I use Nashbar Streetwise tires on my "29er" Velocity Blunt rims. They work great, and cost far less than ninety bucks a pair.

enigmaT120

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Re: i need road tires for my 29-er mountain bike...
« Reply #6 on: April 23, 2014, 03:34:59 PM »
I like the Schwalbe Supremes on my Fargo (700 x 50) but they're expensive. No flats and they aren't worn much after about 4200 miles though.


FuckRx

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Re: i need road tires for my 29-er mountain bike...
« Reply #7 on: April 23, 2014, 04:42:17 PM »

yea then i'm definitely confused because they had about 1 million road tires at the store and he was able to fish out 2 that he said would fit my bike. and i even took my bike in to have him check it out.
the tire says 29x52/52 - what do those numbers mean?

FuckRx

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skyrefuge

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Re: i need road tires for my 29-er mountain bike...
« Reply #9 on: April 23, 2014, 05:39:19 PM »
the tire says 29x52/52 - what do those numbers mean?

The number before the "x" essentially refers to the diameter of your wheel. 29 inches in this case. It's a contrast with the original mountain bikes, which had 26" wheels. The number after the "x" refers to the width of the tire, probably 52mm in this case (ugh, mixing imperial and metric units in one figure, I told you how stupid the bike industry is, didn't I?)

A "700x38C" tire is identical in inside diameter to your "29x52", so it can be used on the same rim. In this case, both the "700" and "38" are millimeters. The difference is that the "38" mm tire will be narrower than your "52" mm tire. And that should be ok, provided your rim isn't too wide (sorry, I can't say exactly how wide "too wide" is). You just want to make sure you don't get a 23mm wide tire or something like that which would likely get swallowed up by your rim.

Maybe the shop assumed you wanted the exact same tire width for your replacement, and that's why they only could come up with one. But if the shop sells any entry-level hybrid/fitness/city/commuter/etc. bikes, they almost surely have smooth 700C tires that are at least up to 38mm wide.

Or, it's entirely possible that the employee could have just been ignorant and unaware that "29er" tires are the same diameter as 700C tires. In that case, maybe you can educate him, and then ask for a discount in return! :-)

skyrefuge

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Re: i need road tires for my 29-er mountain bike...
« Reply #10 on: April 23, 2014, 06:02:30 PM »
arghhhhh

http://forums.mtbr.com/29er-components/29er-vs-700c-tire-565880.html

ha, yeah, I guess that thread shows that there are plenty of ignorant bike-shop employees out there. How embarrassing.

Though I have to say, it's one of the more complete and effective consumer-bamboozlings I've ever seen, so I'm not totally shocked that it overflowed and bamboozled even those in the industry. I remember when 29ers first came out, I was *pretty* sure that they were just bikes with 700C wheels, but it was really hard to find verification of that anywhere on the Internet. Even in that thread, people are reporting that 700C tires "work" on their 29er rims, as if it's some sort of hack they discovered. No, of course they fucking "work", it's the same goddamn thing with a different name!

Some more of the background: 10 years ago, there were "mountain bikes", which had "26 inch" wheels, and "road bikes" (which includes hybrid, touring, etc.) which had bigger, "700C" wheels. Then someone decided to start building "mountain bikes" with the bigger 700C wheels instead of 26" wheels. The obvious thing would have been to simply call them that, "mountain bikes with 700C wheels", but that would have been far too clear and not effective enough in parting fools with their money, so some asshole invented "29er" instead.

In a short while, every major bike manufacturer was making "29ers". Yep, what a brilliant innovation across the industry!

greaper007

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Re: i need road tires for my 29-er mountain bike...
« Reply #11 on: April 23, 2014, 08:57:01 PM »
Well, a 700c or 29er mountain bike wheel is going to have to be built with different components than a road bike wheel. You can't just throw a pair of Mavic Open Pros on a mountain bike and call it a day. I think that's where the difference really comes in. Branding does help the consumer in this respect because 29er always refers to a mountain bike and 700c generally always refers to a road or hybrid bike.

Beyond that, mountain bikes seem to be more of an American type thing and 29er follows the lineage of 26er instead of the metric delineations used for other bicycle wheels. 700c, 650b etc.

skyrefuge

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Re: i need road tires for my 29-er mountain bike...
« Reply #12 on: April 23, 2014, 09:50:37 PM »
Well, a 700c or 29er mountain bike wheel is going to have to be built with different components than a road bike wheel. You can't just throw a pair of Mavic Open Pros on a mountain bike and call it a day.

Sure, and a cyclocross, touring, hybrid, and triathlon bike are going to be built with different wheel components too, but somehow we avoided mass confusion for years despite the lack of "helpful" appellations to distinguish between those versions of 700C wheels. Anyone concerned enough about their bike to actually replace rims/hubs/spokes/wheels is going to have to know so much about bikes to make the appellations irrelevant, so it doesn't help those people at all. All it does is confuse the casual cyclist who simply wants a new tube or tire.

I would also wager that at least 50% of people buying 29ers would be just fine with Mavic Open Pros, since they go off-roading with them just about as frequently as people do with their SUVs.

Beyond that, mountain bikes seem to be more of an American type thing and 29er follows the lineage of 26er instead of the metric delineations used for other bicycle wheels. 700c, 650b etc.

I'm pretty sure the term "26er" was coined only after 29ers were invented. And they had the chance to atone for their past American idiocy by shifting over to a worldwide standard when inventing the big-wheeled version of the mountain bike! But did they take it? Of course not!

GuitarStv

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Re: i need road tires for my 29-er mountain bike...
« Reply #13 on: April 24, 2014, 08:44:50 AM »
I get the dislike of 29er/700C naming . . . it's stupid. What's with the fatbike hatred though?

FuckRx

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Re: i need road tires for my 29-er mountain bike...
« Reply #14 on: April 24, 2014, 09:14:13 AM »

I'm going to walk in next week into this local shop that I try to get most of things from and find out what the deal is. If the sales dude really didn't have any 700cc tires then I understand. If he himself was just ignorant then I understand. But if he was just trying to sell me something perhaps more expensive then I don't think I will go back.

skyrefuge

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Re: i need road tires for my 29-er mountain bike...
« Reply #15 on: April 24, 2014, 10:05:29 AM »
I get the dislike of 29er/700C naming . . . it's stupid. What's with the fatbike hatred though?

No hate for the fatbike, just hate for the industry that markets them! It's a ridiculously specialized (and crazy-expensive) piece of equipment that is being sold to people who will get no use of it. It was bad enough when slow, heavy mountain bikes became the "standard" bike sold to the average Joe who just wanted to ride around the neighborhood (and Joe bought them for the exact same reason he bought SUVs...he thinks it makes him look "cool", and, "hey, maybe I'll take it off-road some day!"). But the average Joe buying a fatbike is more like buying an actual monster truck (the kind designed to roll over cars). Yes, there are a couple dozen people in the world who will find a monster truck genuinely useful (people who compete in monster truck shows), and maybe there are a few more that will find a fatbike useful, but they certainly aren't the poor suckers who I see riding them down Chicago's Lakefront Path on a spring day.

When I walk into a Specialized or Trek dealer and see a fatbike prominently displayed right next to the front door, and no genuinely-useful-in-almost-all-circumstances touring bikes even in stock, something is pretty fucked up.

bacchi

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Re: i need road tires for my 29-er mountain bike...
« Reply #16 on: April 24, 2014, 08:55:41 PM »
I've used a fatbike...on a glacier.

Russ

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Re: i need road tires for my 29-er mountain bike...
« Reply #17 on: April 24, 2014, 09:33:13 PM »
Hello, bike industry here.

I assure you that the big sinister marketing machine is nothing more that a bunch of bike-loving people sharing what they think is cool. "Hey we made a fatbike and it's fun to ride. We're stoked on it, let's put it in front!", not "Let's invent this new useless bike to sell to all the consumerist suckers." Especially considering all the people in the office who wanted one and couldn't get it because we sold out in a week.

Well, a 700c or 29er mountain bike wheel is going to have to be built with different components than a road bike wheel. You can't just throw a pair of Mavic Open Pros on a mountain bike and call it a day.

Sure, and a cyclocross, touring, hybrid, and triathlon bike are going to be built with different wheel components too, but somehow we avoided mass confusion for years despite the lack of "helpful" appellations to distinguish between those versions of 700C wheels. Anyone concerned enough about their bike to actually replace rims/hubs/spokes/wheels is going to have to know so much about bikes to make the appellations irrelevant, so it doesn't help those people at all. All it does is confuse the casual cyclist who simply wants a new tube or tire.

I would also wager that at least 50% of people buying 29ers would be just fine with Mavic Open Pros, since they go off-roading with them just about as frequently as people do with their SUVs.

The difference is that tires 700C x 20mm - 35mm or so will all work well enough on the same rim width, which covers everything above. Go significantly wider than that... say, MTB tires... and a wider rim is necessary. So no, OPros would not work for mountain biking (and that's just the width problem, not to mention MTB rims are built stronger/heavier); the differentiation does help people who don't know the difference; and there's no way "you should spec MTB's with slicks and narrow rims because people will only ride them on the road" is anything but ridiculous. We do make those, they're called hybrids. If someone wants a MTB despite the LBS directing them to the proper bike for the job, that's a personal problem (I have examples here on this very forum *gasp* if you don't think that happens often)

ed.: also, DT Swiss RR465 over Open Pros if you want an $80 double eyelet road rim
« Last Edit: April 25, 2014, 09:34:23 AM by Russ »

Russ

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Re: i need road tires for my 29-er mountain bike...
« Reply #18 on: April 24, 2014, 09:52:10 PM »
OP, buy these in the 45mm sizeway unless you need supa dupa flat protection

Jack

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Re: i need road tires for my 29-er mountain bike...
« Reply #19 on: April 24, 2014, 10:02:14 PM »
It was bad enough when slow, heavy mountain bikes became the "standard" bike sold to the average Joe who just wanted to ride around the neighborhood (and Joe bought them for the exact same reason he bought SUVs...he thinks it makes him look "cool", and, "hey, maybe I'll take it off-road some day!").

Suspensions and knobby tires are indeed stupid to sell to the average Joe. However, I see value in having a heavier-duty bike for riding around the neighborhood, for several reasons:
  • Joe is statistically-likely to be a fatass, who might weigh too much for a lightweight road bike to support.
  • Mountain bikes tend to have a much lower low gear than road bikes (i.e., a "granny gear") and Joe may actually need it.
  • A road bike with skinny tires doesn't just have trouble on a hardcore mountain bike trail, it has trouble handling a mere gravel path, and gravel paths exist even in the city. A bike with wide but smooth tires has the appropriate amount of versatility.


GuitarStv

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Re: i need road tires for my 29-er mountain bike...
« Reply #20 on: April 25, 2014, 06:06:44 AM »
  • A road bike with skinny tires doesn't just have trouble on a hardcore mountain bike trail, it has trouble handling a mere gravel path, and gravel paths exist even in the city. A bike with wide but smooth tires has the appropriate amount of versatility.

My road (touring) bike with 700x32s works great on gravel paths, and very potholed roads. They're hella hard to find though, all the minimal spoke count, super tiny rear chainstay, seat two feet above the bars, ADDING ATTACHMENTS POINTS FOR A RACK IS LIKE VIOLATING YOUR GRANDMOTHER, racing bikes seem to have taken over the world of drop bars unfortunately. Cyclocross bikes are sometimes available at least.

skyrefuge

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Re: i need road tires for my 29-er mountain bike...
« Reply #21 on: April 25, 2014, 09:54:04 AM »
Hello, bike industry here.

I assure you that the big sinister marketing machine is nothing more that a bunch of bike-loving people sharing what they think is cool. "Hey we made a fatbike and it's fun to ride. We're stoked on it, let's put it in front!", not "Let's invent this new useless bike to sell to all the consumerist suckers."

Sure, I have no doubt that most of the dudes working in the shops (and even some people at headquarters) aren't thinking with dollar-signs in mind, but I find it really hard to believe that there weren't a bunch of number-crunchers at Trek who, after letting the little guys take the lead, ran the math and saw the kind of outsize profits they could make by following on the fatbike trend, selling their own, and pricing it at $2600. Same with the $10k Madones, or the auto industry and SUVs; all areas where manufacturers wisely found psychological tricks that allowed them to sell to consumers for higher prices than they would otherwise pay. Or are you saying that there aren't actually any profit-minded people in the bike industry?

Especially considering all the people in the office who wanted one and couldn't get it because we sold out in a week.

Have you considered that all the people in the office might in fact be consumerist suckers? :-)

The difference is that tires 700C x 20mm - 35mm or so will all work well enough on the same rim width, which covers everything above. Go significantly wider than that... say, MTB tires... and a wider rim is necessary. So no, OPros would not work for mountain biking (and that's just the width problem, not to mention MTB rims are built stronger/heavier);

Yeah, I didn't say that OPros would be good for actual mountain biking, just that a lot of people with mountain bikes would be fine with OPros since they don't actually use their bikes for mountain biking. Maybe it's different where you live, but every single plastic-grocery-bag-hanging-from-handlebars forced-by-need bike commuter I see in the suburbs out here is riding a frikkin' mountain bike. The top-selling bike at Wal-Mart? A frikkin' mountain bike. At least it's not the full-suspension version, but they still sell plenty of those too. :-(

Maybe Mavic is a bad example, but of their 5 "29er" rims, 4 of them are only 19mm wide (and the 5th is only 2mm wider). 3 of their 7 "road" rims are the same 19mm wide. So in terms of tire width, it really appears that the average "29er" rim is no different than a standard hybrid/touring rim. (curiously, their recommend tire widths for their 19mm road rims are 28-47mm, which matches the ISO 5995 standard, while for their 19mm MTB rims, they recommend 38-58mm (1.5-2.3in) tires; I'm not sure if there's a technical reason for that, or if that's just more marketing leaking out).

and there's no way "you should spec MTB's with slicks and narrow rims because people will only ride them on the road" is anything but ridiculous. We do make those, they're called hybrids. If someone wants a MTB despite the LBS directing them to the proper bike for the job, that's a personal problem

Yeah, I'm certainly not recommending that actual MTBs are sold with slicks and narrow rims (though, given that Mavic actually makes a few 17mm MTB rims, some surely are!), just that people don't buy MTBs if they aren't going to be doing much mountain biking. And similarly, that they don't buy fatbikes, unless they already have at least 5 other bikes and are FI 3x over (or, are one of the 0.01% of the population that lives somewhere where a fatbike would actually be the optimal bike to use more than twice a year).

Sure, people frequently make sub-optimal decisions, but it's not entirely a "personal problem"; they are heavily-influenced by marketing to make those sub-optimal decisions. As Mustachians, we aren't to simply throw up our hands and say "eh, oh well", we're supposed to point out those tricksy marketers for what they are and punch some goddamn faces!!

skyrefuge

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Re: i need road tires for my 29-er mountain bike...
« Reply #22 on: April 25, 2014, 10:25:17 AM »
Suspensions and knobby tires are indeed stupid to sell to the average Joe. However, I see value in having a heavier-duty bike for riding around the neighborhood, for several reasons:
  • Joe is statistically-likely to be a fatass, who might weigh too much for a lightweight road bike to support.
  • Mountain bikes tend to have a much lower low gear than road bikes (i.e., a "granny gear") and Joe may actually need it.
  • A road bike with skinny tires doesn't just have trouble on a hardcore mountain bike trail, it has trouble handling a mere gravel path, and gravel paths exist even in the city. A bike with wide but smooth tires has the appropriate amount of versatility.

Oh, yeah, completely agreed. Lightweight road bikes are just as silly of specialized tool to sell to the general population as mountain bikes are. Luckily, it's not the 80s (the era when the skinny-tired road bike was "the standard bike") or the the 90s (the era when the knobby-tired mountain bike was the "standard bike") anymore, and the far-more suitable "hybrid bike" has been "invented", which meets your 3 criteria, without having the downsides of a mountain bike.

Unfortunately the lasting power of historical marketing (that becomes ingrained in culture) continues to trick people into buying MTBs, and current-day marketing sends them to fatbikes and single-speeds, so there are still lots of people buying the wrong bike, but at least it's getting better!