Author Topic: Warmest Winter Coat? (Read 14839 times)

quelinda

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Warmest Winter Coat?
« on: August 14, 2015, 04:10:11 PM »
I'm tired of freezing every single winter. I'm a SAHM who often walks her kids to and from school, and has to wait outside for them to go into school in the morning and come out at the end of the day. I'm in Wisconsin and I think I'm still shell-shocked from the winter before last.

I have a down coat from Lands' End, but even with that, a fleece jacket under that, a sweater and two shirts under THAT, and leggings under jeans (and of course, warm boots/hat/scarf/mittens), I'm STILL freezing.

I don't mind investing the money in a really good, warm coat, but I don't know what to buy. Everyone around here seems to have a NorthFace parka, but I don't know if that's just the moms being trendy or practical.

abhe8

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2015, 05:20:34 PM »
Down coats come in all "strengths". Go for land end s warmest rating. And drink lots of hot drinks.

abhe8

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2015, 05:21:23 PM »
I think north face is all branding. Pategonia also has good quality stuff, and really warm coats and layers.

RosieTR

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2015, 05:42:27 PM »
Get what the ice-fishing enthusiasts wear. Or look up in Outside magazine or at a place like REI and find out what ice climbers and climbers going to Denali get. One of those sources should have stuff that fits a female figure. The brands are less an indicator than the model. Good ones have ratings, but read reviews. You are correct though, a really good coat will keep you warm. Don't skimp on gloves/mittens either if your hands are a factor.

Emg03063

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #4 on: August 14, 2015, 05:58:44 PM »
Layering is good; coats are good. If you're really serious about not being cold, (and don't care about appearances) tho, go for a onesie. One of these with some medium weight polypropylene base layers and goretex shells kept me pretty toasty on Mt. Washington in 80 mph wind at 0 deg F:

http://ebay.com/itm/North-Face-Himalayan-Suit-Pertex-Endurance-800-Down-Mens-Jacket-Parka-NWT-995-L-/221831534263

(Sorry I can't seem to find a women's model).

Beardog

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2015, 06:10:27 PM »
I have a dress-length, hooded down LLBean coat that is very warm. Coats with inner cuffs at the wrist of the coat sleeves can help hold the warmth inside. Also, I wear wind breaking pants over my regular pants from fall through winter. This will keep your legs warm. I highly recommend the wind breaking pants; it makes a big difference in your comfort. In addition, when it's extra cold, I wear fleece lined pants or long underwear under my wind breaking pants.

historienne

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2015, 06:36:17 PM »
I recommend one of the Patagonia double-layer coats, such as the Tres or Stormdrift. A lot of down coats have good insulation, but don't have a proper shell, which plays a big role in stopping wind.

You can probably find a lightly used or past-season one for significantly cheaper.

TheThirstyStag

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #7 on: August 14, 2015, 06:40:02 PM »
Consider investing in a well-made merino wool base layer. You'd be surprised how much heat it keeps in, while remaining breathable

Fi(re) on the Farm

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #8 on: August 14, 2015, 06:41:14 PM »
I have a knee length land end down coat that I bought on clearance with 40% off (Christmas sale) and it keeps me warm on my freezing cold trek to work in upstate NY winters. I do have a few layers under it which I think is key. Maybe throw some hand warmers in your pockets before you go outside?

wtjbatman

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #9 on: August 14, 2015, 06:51:04 PM »
I recommend following all of the above advice. At once. If you leave the house in Wisconsin with less than a couple dozen layers on, you're gonna have a bad time.

quelinda

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #10 on: August 14, 2015, 06:52:24 PM »
I recommend following all of the above advice. At once. If you leave the house in Wisconsin with less than a couple dozen layers on, you're gonna have a bad time.

Ha!

Evgenia

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #11 on: August 14, 2015, 07:06:56 PM »
I lived in Chicago (a few blocks off of Lake Michigan, too) for seven years without a car, and the Lands End Commuter Coat got me through the worst of it:
http://landsend.com/products/womens-down-commuter-long-coat/id_280805

I would also slip Ibex or Ramblers Way wool long john pants on under my skirt before my commute, and took to wearing calf length wool skirts as well. I also had knee length boots that were insulated. The high boot + long skirt + long coat combo was mighty effective.

Sometimes, once I was in the El train, the long johns could be a little too warm, and I'd wear these wool tights instead:
http://reviews.vermontcountrystore.com/8531-en_us/53686/the-vermont-country-store-best-fit-merino-wool-tights-reviews/reviews.htm
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vhalros

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #12 on: August 14, 2015, 07:14:44 PM »
Down coats are labeled with their fill power (basically, how many many cubic inches an ounce of the stuff occupies; a measure of how fluffy the down used is and thus how much air it traps). 300 is low, 700 is high (probably over kill for anything short of exploring Antarctica), 800 is about as high it gets. If a coat does not mention the fill power, it is low. Even the low fill power ones are very warm for a Boston winter in my experience, but it depends on what temperatures you are dealing with.

The bad thing about down is it is not too useful if it gets wet, including from your own perspiration (although walking would be fine). So it is not the best choice if you plan on being active out doors; synthetic down alternatives like primaloft would be better in this case. Wool also deals well with water, but wool coats by themselves are not usually that warm.
« Last Edit: August 14, 2015, 07:19:47 PM by vhalros »

regulator

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #13 on: August 14, 2015, 07:55:37 PM »
Alternatively, find a hunter and ask them what they wear in the winter.

lizzzi

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #14 on: August 14, 2015, 08:05:24 PM »
Merino wool long underwear, wool knee socks, Columbia Bug-a-Boots, jeans and cotton turtleneck, wool sweater, preferably a long, knee length one over the turtleneck, good ski gloves or mittens, and a wool ski cap...for the down parka, I have an Eddie Bauer...think it is called a Lodge Parka...it is knee length, has a detachable hood (great for the worst days--pull it up over your wool hat), double zipper (can zip, unzip from either end--good if driving), and has a nice warm material in the pockets, at the cuffs, and inside the neck. If it's sub-zero, especially if the wind is blowing, wrap a wool scarf around the hood to cover your nose and mouth. I don't have windbreaker pants, but they sound like a good idea.

So to sum up...try an Eddie Bauer parka and see what you think...if it doesn't ring your chimes...you can always send it or take it back. And be sure you are wearing a lot of wool. Cashmere is my favorite, but of course is pricey.( I have an alpaca hat--can't wear it if it's above freezing because it gets too hot--got it from Vermont on Etsy--the lady who made it sent me pictures of the two alpacas she sheared to get the fleece.)

brooklynmoney

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #15 on: August 14, 2015, 09:04:31 PM »
Canada Goose tres chic and warm. Quite expensive but worth it!

Rachelocity

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #16 on: August 14, 2015, 09:19:24 PM »
I got through last year's bitter Montreal cold in absolute comfort in my Kanuk coat. I got mine for $70.00 on craigslist. New, it would have been closer to $700.00, but I plan to have the coat for 10 years, so the cost-per-wearing is minimal. Plus, it weighs less than a down coat. Last year, I was rehabbing a fractured shoulder and the weight of a down coat would have been unbearable.

The_path_less_taken

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #17 on: August 15, 2015, 07:21:54 AM »
I used to work in a ski resort, standing in one spot outside all day.

The warmest thing I found was the silver filament silk underlayers: it's antimicrobial, and the silver reflects the heat back towards your body.

They also make it in glove liners, same principal. Although on really bitter days those chemical hand warmer packs (Costco) were a lifesaver when the wind picked up.

Until people have been in Wisconsin or Canadian type of cold, they don't realize how bitter a feeling it is to ache with it.

I'd wear the silver filament silk, then on really bad days wool longjohns, pants, and if it was windy I'd had the windbreaker pants (or ski pants, basically) over that. Toasty.

MacGyverIt

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #18 on: August 15, 2015, 07:36:21 AM »
Canada Goose, hands down. They're very expensive -- for a valid reason. I bought my coat on eBay (from someone in Canada -- what better testament to its warmth is that?) and have zero problem standing out at the bus stop in below freezing weather. Here's a great article from the Chicago Tribune which pretty much sums it up:

http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2009-02-22/features/0902180362_1_coat-lands-end-canadians
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BlueMR2

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #19 on: August 15, 2015, 07:37:37 AM »
I'm a fan of 5.11 Tactical. They cater to the LEO/EMT crowd who have to endure all kinds of ridiculous weather/conditions. A little pricy, but good quality, works very well, lasts a long time.

Lanthiriel

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #20 on: August 15, 2015, 12:42:14 PM »
+1 for Canada Goose. My husband had the Expedition parka, which has kept him warm in the winters doing fieldwork in interior Alaska.

quelinda

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #21 on: August 15, 2015, 12:49:53 PM »
+1 for Canada Goose. My husband had the Expedition parka, which has kept him warm in the winters doing fieldwork in interior Alaska.

This is what I'm leaning toward, but man, the cost upfront! I would wear it into the ground, though, and in Wisconsin it would get used six months of the year. But still, it's a lot of money.

Goldielocks

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #22 on: August 15, 2015, 01:15:37 PM »
Something like this.

Note the heavy windproof layer with no sew thru baffles, covered zipper, fur trimmed tunnel hood that extends well past your face and overall length. Knee length is best but mid thigh at least. Does not need to be down but you need a lot of fill, and room for wool or fleece layer or tuck in a neck scarf inside.

Wind proof pants with insulation for very cold windy days and you are all set for night ice fishing or changing a tire at -30 in North Dakota ( not a recommended activity!)

http://tomandtilly.ie/alaska-parka-jacket-red.html

OK this is a kids coat but you get the picture.

Oh, and those trendy down 'coats' with the sewn baffles are really supposed to be the INSIDE layer of a true coat system, people wear them in fall and spring and warm sunny winter days, or as a camping layer... The fashion industry added trimmed hoods and sold them like coats, not people who live in cold winter areas.
« Last Edit: August 15, 2015, 01:21:58 PM by goldielocks »

gaja

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #23 on: August 15, 2015, 02:38:06 PM »
One thing that hasn't been mentioned, is the temperature difference. If you lower the temperature in your house and car slowly, your body will adapt. That way you can handle colder outdoor temperatures during the middle of winter.

Layering is essential. Good woollen clothes in several layers. A thick woollen sweater underneath a windresistant coat will take you a long way, especially if you have several thinner layers underneath it. And then of course a good hat, mittons (not gloves), and very good boots. Make sure that the coat is long enough; arctic animals have evolved shorter extremeties (legs, necks..) compared to their bodies, to reduce the surface to volume ratio. Try to do the same, only with clothing.

Another thing: I'm guessing you feel the cold the most when you stand still waiting? There is a trick to this, I don't know if you have tried it? The point of layering is to keep air that has been heated by your body as a form of insulation. When you move, some of that warm air disappears and is replaced by cold air. When you walk or work in the cold, you produce enough new heat that it doesn't bother you too much. But small movements when you stand "still" causes you to loose heat. Therefore, you should try to stand almost completely still, and with your clothes as loose on your body as possible (to maximise the insulating air layers). Divide the weight equally on your legs, hunch your shoulders a bit inwards and forwards, and keep your head down. If you hit the right balance, you can stay still for hours without getting too cold. I learned it from someone who had been in the military in the north, standing guard for hours in freezin temperatures.
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SunshineAZ

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #24 on: August 15, 2015, 04:10:00 PM »
I have never lived anywhere super cold, (being from So. Cal.) but it does get pretty cold here in AZ because we are at 5000 feet and it even snows sometimes. So I don't know if this would apply to you, but I have found that the most important thing for me is warm socks and shoes. It doesn't matter how thick my jacket is, if my feet (and to a lesser extent my hands) are cold, I will be cold. I have an extensive collection of thick wool socks and Columbia or Cabela's thinsulate boots.

Seppia

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #25 on: August 15, 2015, 04:20:16 PM »

Consider investing in a well-made merino wool base layer. You'd be surprised how much heat it keeps in, while remaining breathable

BIG quote on this.
I recommend Minus33 merino wool long sleeve base layers.
Around $60 each on Amazon, they are expensive (actually, compared to more known brands they're pretty cheap, merino wool IS expensive) but worth every single penny.

bobechs

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #26 on: August 15, 2015, 04:34:18 PM »
Canadian Army Parka.

1. Warm enough for the Canadian Army
2. Not down
3. Cheap
4. Stylish in a perverse way. The slotted buttons are iconic.
5. You will need to understand the Canadian take on NATO sizing. The numbers are nominal chest/height
6. Get the real arctic/hooded -not the gore-tex intermediate type- for ultimate warmth
7. Here: http://ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=p2050601.m570.l1311.R1.TR1.TRC0.A0.H1.Xcanadian+army+park.TRS0&_nkw=canadian+army+parka&_sacat=0

MsPeacock

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #27 on: August 15, 2015, 05:49:46 PM »
I have a shin-length lands end waterproof down coat. I think it might be their commuter coat. It is quite warm. I top myself off with a Elmer Fudd style hat with ear flaps. Quite warm overall. A scarf also helps because we lose a lot of heat through our chests.

Agree with others about warmer inner layers. I have two Patagonia super warm layering shirts (thin). They are honestly too warm for me most of the time and I often have tot make my coat off if I have worn them and exert myself at all. I bought them about 20 years ago. They seemed very costly at the time but they have obviously held up. Marmot makes some similar shirts as well. Avoid cotton layers. Cotton is a summer textile for a reason.

Lanthiriel

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #28 on: August 15, 2015, 05:51:17 PM »
+1 for Canada Goose. My husband had the Expedition parka, which has kept him warm in the winters doing fieldwork in interior Alaska.

This is what I'm leaning toward, but man, the cost upfront! I would wear it into the ground, though, and in Wisconsin it would get used six months of the year. But still, it's a lot of money.

It is a lot of money. We were lucky that his mom bought it as his "first career job" gift. She can't hold on to money to save her life so I don't feel bad being the recipient of the outflow occasionally. I think his was $800, but it's built to last.

kimmarg

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #29 on: August 15, 2015, 06:05:14 PM »
Long underwear and wind proof are the keys! I wear LL Bean silk long underwear which is amazingly war and thin. The make sure the jacket is windproof - down can still get blown through. Also like someone said warm feet help. Sometimes it's the whole package to keep you warm. Also don't forget snowpants. I got over wearing bib snowpants to work at age 32 once I realized how much more comfortable I am for the portion of the day I'm outside!

lizzzi

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #30 on: August 16, 2015, 09:35:32 AM »
Can anyone who has a Canada Goose parka comment on how the sizes run? True to size? Order a size up? If I get one (just considering it--I am outside in the cold every single day in the winter--out in the woods)...I would have to order through the mail, and would like to get it right the first times. Thanks in advance.

rubybeth

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #31 on: August 16, 2015, 10:00:30 AM »
Minnesotan here, and I walk to work until is -10. You say you have a Lands' End jacket, but not how long it is. I have one of the longest down ones available, so it goes basically to my knees, and I think mine is rated for -30 or -40. You can sort by temp rating. Mine also has the big hood with the fake fur, which really helps. I double the hood with a very warm hat (wool lined with fleece, typically), and scarves. I can't stress how important scarves are to keeping warm. I generally wear two scarves (one more fashion-y that matches my sweater for the work day, plus a cashmere or wool scarf for extra warmth/bulk). I also usually add fleece over my sweater if it's really cold. And for my typical clothing, I usually do a t-shirt or long-sleeve t-shirt with sweater, and underneath, long underwear (Cuddle Duds is my brand of preference, but I also like Eddie Bauer's).

Typically when I walk to work, the only part of me that gets cold is my knees. :)
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quelinda

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #32 on: August 16, 2015, 09:02:20 PM »
Minnesotan here, and I walk to work until is -10. You say you have a Lands' End jacket, but not how long it is. I have one of the longest down ones available, so it goes basically to my knees, and I think mine is rated for -30 or -40. You can sort by temp rating. Mine also has the big hood with the fake fur, which really helps. I double the hood with a very warm hat (wool lined with fleece, typically), and scarves. I can't stress how important scarves are to keeping warm. I generally wear two scarves (one more fashion-y that matches my sweater for the work day, plus a cashmere or wool scarf for extra warmth/bulk). I also usually add fleece over my sweater if it's really cold. And for my typical clothing, I usually do a t-shirt or long-sleeve t-shirt with sweater, and underneath, long underwear (Cuddle Duds is my brand of preference, but I also like Eddie Bauer's).

Typically when I walk to work, the only part of me that gets cold is my knees. :)

The down coat is almost to my knees, and was rated the warmest they had. I pretty much stated this in my OP, but I also wear:

*a pair of cotton socks under a pair of wool socks under Ugg-knockoffs.
*leggings under jeans.
*Cuddl Duds-type shirt under a cotton shirt, under a wool shirt, under a wool sweater.
*a fleece jacket under the down coat.
*a fleece neck gator & sometimes a scarf.
*a fleece-lined wool hat with earflaps.
*windproof down gloves or mittens (new as of last year & helped a LOT).

Even with all of this I am still freezing. I have a chronic illness that causes me to have bouts of fatigue and I seem to get chilled more easily than other people. I'm always the most bundled-up mom on the playground. This is why I'm pretty much thinking I have to bite the bullet and get a REALLY warm coat. I can't add any more layers.

moosestache

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #33 on: August 16, 2015, 09:16:41 PM »
Are you cold all over or does it start with your legs? Lots of women in Anchorage wear insulated skirts over their pants called skhoop skirts.

quelinda

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #34 on: August 17, 2015, 06:41:46 AM »
Are you cold all over or does it start with your legs? Lots of women in Anchorage wear insulated skirts over their pants called skhoop skirts.

All over. I do wear snowpants sometimes when it's really bitter cold.

rubybeth

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #35 on: August 17, 2015, 07:47:20 AM »
Ah, okay, with the illness, I think you should bite the bullet and buy something recommended here. I'm curious to know if it helps--please do report back! :) I'd be willing to get a second coat for the coldest days of the year (honestly, I usually get overly warm when walking to work since I'm moving as quickly as I can, but if a warmer coat would mean I could walk when it's below -10, I might consider it). Good luck!
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KCM5

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #36 on: August 17, 2015, 07:48:05 AM »
Do your layers make things tight? Tight clothing doesn't have the same insulating power as loose clothing. (so check on the boots particularly)

Sounds like you have everything right - I hope you find something that works for you.

quelinda

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #37 on: August 17, 2015, 07:53:28 AM »
Do your layers make things tight? Tight clothing doesn't have the same insulating power as loose clothing. (so check on the boots particularly)

Sounds like you have everything right - I hope you find something that works for you.

The only tight thing is the leggings, and they have to be to fit under my jeans. But my boots are not overly tight -- in fact, my feet are really warm in my Ugg knock-offs (the only thing that keeps them warm).

I will definitely report back if I get something super warm. I'm really leaning toward just shelling out the cash for a Canada Goose parka. My youngest starts junior kindergarten this fall, so I have 7 years of elementary school to walk kids to and from.

Kaspian

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #38 on: August 17, 2015, 10:04:47 AM »
Please don't be a Canada Douche. :(

You really don't want to support that damn coyote trim business with the bloody leg-traps and all that. Most people now would never dream of buying a full-length fur coat, but somehow it all gets brushed under the carpet with the trendy-ass, rich people Canada Goose coats.

http://dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2544075/Revealed-Chilling-cruelty-unspeakable-suffering-corporate-denial-Is-TRUE-cost-seasons-Canada-Goose-coat.html

http://canadadouche.tumblr.com/

Get a nice coat with real shearling. I know it's still an animal, but thick shearling is warmer than all those bird feathers and coyote skin anyway.

Something like this: http://jackets.cwmalls.com/sheepskin-shearling-coat-for-women-cw614022.html

Quote
https://shearling.com/about_shearling.asp

But why buy a shearling coat? Shearling coats are strong and rugged, more so than any other material or cloth. Theyre also warmer than duck or goose down. Theyre lighter than fur in terms of weight. Shearling coats are not that hard to care for. It is usually not necessary to take these coats to the dry cleaners; however, most cleaners can remove visible dirt or stains. Most shearling coats are also water resistant and wont be damaged if cared for properly. Coats that have gotten wet from rain or snow must be dried at room temperature once theyre dry, water spots are simply brushed off.... Shearling coats are not damaged by moths or any type of insect.

I live in Canada and own a shearling bomber jacket and break a sweat if the temperature is over -20C/-4F. It's possibly the one major purchase I'm glad I made pre-Mustchian. But if I lost it tomorrow, I'd be scouring every single web site looking for a reasonably priced used replacement.
« Last Edit: August 17, 2015, 10:50:39 AM by Kaspian »
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GuitarStv

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #39 on: August 17, 2015, 10:29:29 AM »
I've always worn proper ski jackets for winter. Make sure there's a wind/waterproof shell with a warm fleece interior and a hood. The jacket should fit a little baggy on you (tight restricts blood flow and makes you colder). If it's really nippy, put a warm fleece on under the jacket.

This has kept me quite comfortable for long periods in -40 conditions with a toque, warm gloves, winter boots, and ski pants.

Jouer

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #40 on: August 17, 2015, 12:00:29 PM »
I agree with what Kaspian said re: Canada Goose.

Before you plop down that kind of coin, make sure you are not the kind of person who cares about ethical treatment of animals.

yyc-phil

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #41 on: August 17, 2015, 12:00:52 PM »
Canada Goose without a doubt. Second of course to a caribou hide parka worn by Inuit when they go hunting on the ice floe. I could not survive Yellowknife and Arctic winters without my Canada Goose: a North Face or Kanuk, let alone LL Bean and other name brands would not cut it. When I bike in winter, which is quite often, I wear layers: a thin cotton undershirt, a North Face medium-pile fleece pullover, a North Face soft shell zippered jacket, all under an unlined North Face Gore-Tex jacket.
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yyc-phil

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #42 on: August 17, 2015, 12:05:59 PM »
Can anyone who has a Canada Goose parka comment on how the sizes run? True to size? Order a size up? If I get one (just considering it--I am outside in the cold every single day in the winter--out in the woods)...I would have to order through the mail, and would like to get it right the first times. Thanks in advance.

Mine is true to size. I usually take Medium for tops, and the Medium fits perfectly, even with an extra wool or fleece sweater under. If you order, make sure you check the official Canada Goose website to verify the retailer sells genuine Canada Goose apparel and not cheap and potentially dangerous fakes.
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lizzzi

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #43 on: August 17, 2015, 12:32:20 PM »
I didn't really the ethical implications for Canada Goose. Guess I'll have to research and think about it some more.

lizzzi

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #44 on: August 17, 2015, 12:33:11 PM »
Duh...sorry for typo. Meant to say "I didn't realize...

Emg03063

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #45 on: August 17, 2015, 06:26:16 PM »
Even with all of this I am still freezing. I have a chronic illness that causes me to have bouts of fatigue and I seem to get chilled more easily than other people. I'm always the most bundled-up mom on the playground. This is why I'm pretty much thinking I have to bite the bullet and get a REALLY warm coat. I can't add any more layers.

If the core problem here (no pun originally intended) is a lack of body heat generation, and not a lack of insulation, you might consider carrying a couple of these in interior pockets, close to, but not touching your skin. They're reusable (to a point), and waaaaay less expensive than a coat, so maybe a pretty Mustachian option: http://campmor.com/the-heat-solution-reusable-heat-pack.shtml

Kaspian

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #46 on: August 18, 2015, 11:48:57 AM »
I didn't really the ethical implications for Canada Goose. Guess I'll have to research and think about it some more.

...And they're not the warmest anyway. Shearling is better. (Yeah, I'm a big fan.)

I wouldn't begrudge somebody who bought an old, used sable or mink coat made in the 80s before we all knew better. But making new coats using leg traps where some poor beast's paw gets broken and it sits there for days waiting to die of starvation or be shot? Yeah, we really shouldn't be doing that sort of barbaric stuff anymore. So screw Canada Goose. (BTW, I'm not an animal activist at all, it just seems like common modern sense.)
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yyc-phil

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #47 on: August 18, 2015, 12:12:13 PM »
I didn't really the ethical implications for Canada Goose. Guess I'll have to research and think about it some more.
Yeah, we really shouldn't be doing that sort of barbaric stuff anymore. So screw Canada Goose. (BTW, I'm not an animal activist at all, it just seems like common modern sense.)

I think you may just have become one.
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Melody

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #48 on: August 20, 2015, 04:06:07 AM »
I bought a ski jacket from zumiez (they have a website if you aren't in the USA) the brand is called aperture and I think it was about $150. It just looks like a basic black army type jacket (actually can be fashionable in an endgy way with the right skinny jeans and nice boots). Even in minus 24 i could wear just this, a tank top and a really thin knit

Melody

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Re: Warmest Winter Coat?
« Reply #49 on: August 20, 2015, 04:11:39 AM »
(That's Minus 24 celcius). Also because it's for skiing it breathes so you don't get hot walking around.it's also 100% waterproof. When you enter the house its only one layer to remove as I would wear my tank top and knit in the house. Not all ski clothes looks obviously like ski clothes... There are more stylish options out there. Imho ski clothes are much warmer than north face and the like which are targeted towards hikers (where warmth is important but weight has priority). I have also tried down previously and found it useless. My trench (not sure what it's made of, maybe wool) is warm but doesn't take kindly to water and is dry clean only so that's a fail for a busy mum. You can wash the ski jacket by hand.