Author Topic: Ignition switch diy (Read 4947 times)

Murse

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 422
Ignition switch diy
« on: December 10, 2014, 01:46:25 PM »
Question, is an ignition switch replacement something a non-mechanically inclined person can diy?

cartechguy

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 52
Re: Ignition switch diy
« Reply #1 on: December 10, 2014, 02:29:25 PM »
Can you give me the year and make of the car? I will steer you in the right direction (haha)

Retired ASE certified mechanic working at the beach in sunny FL!

Murse

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 422
Re: Ignition switch diy
« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2014, 02:31:51 PM »
2005 chevy classic. I went and got a quote of 400$ (labor and parts) I am hoping I can find a a more mustachian way.

cartechguy

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 52
Re: Ignition switch diy
« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2014, 04:33:03 PM »
It gets a bit dicey with the ignition on cars these days to due FACTORY ALARMS!! Does this car have a factory alarm on it? Because, if this is equipped with an immobilizer which is an electronic security device fitted to an automobile that prevents the engine from running unless the correct key (or other token) is present. This prevents the car from being "hot wired" after entry has been achieved.

So in English if you have the NEW key with the NEW ignition and your chip in the new key won't be read with the existing immobilizer. Therefore the car won't start it will just keep turning over!! You need to find out IF this car has an immobilizer IF it DOES $400 is great!! If doesn't (which I hope for) see if you can buy the part from Rock Auto and have someone put it in for you.

There is a workaround the immobilizer and that is to put in the NEW ignition and take your OLD ignition key and put it close to the ignition and you when the security light goes off start the car with NEW ignition key!!
I have had success a few times doing this for customers who had Avalons and didn't want to put a $1000 ignition with NEW immobilizer and having the keys programmed!!

Sorry, if this is confusing!!
Retired ASE certified mechanic working at the beach in sunny FL!

Murse

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 422
Re: Ignition switch diy
« Reply #4 on: December 10, 2014, 06:34:09 PM »
How do I find out if it has an immobilizer?

cartechguy

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 52
Re: Ignition switch diy
« Reply #5 on: December 11, 2014, 04:55:47 AM »
I am 90% sure that this car has one. It sucks with all these new security features on cars a simple fix becomes expensive. To avoid a headache and possible reprogramming of keys issues I would let the place that quoted you the $400 to repair the car. If it was a car from the 80's or early 90's its an EASY fix!

Retired ASE certified mechanic working at the beach in sunny FL!

Murse

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 422
Re: Ignition switch diy
« Reply #6 on: December 11, 2014, 07:39:12 AM »
Thanks for the help :)

Ashyukun

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 270
Re: Ignition switch diy
« Reply #7 on: December 11, 2014, 08:36:14 AM »
The 2005 Chevy Classic is essentially the same as the 1999-2003 Malibu, which definitely did have the immobilization 'feature' (quotes used because I found multiple instances of people complaining it had gone horribly awry and made their cars unusable). There are procedures to bypass it, such as those found here: http://bergerweb.net/PasslockFix/index.shtml but it requires a bit of work.

I ran into it myself when the ignition went out on my parents' 2000 Oldsmobile Intrigue. I got a replacement switch and swapped it in, but ran into the issue with the immobilization not recognizing the new module. After a lot of searching on my phone (we were at a summer camp for a week...) and swearing at the engineers I found the full 'relearn' procedure and was able to get it going again.

svi

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 17
Re: Ignition switch diy
« Reply #8 on: December 11, 2014, 08:37:16 AM »
was the place that quoted you a dealership? if so, i would seek a second opinion. some locksmith companies have the ability to reprogram blank tokens as well. may be cheaper.

ketchup

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2828
Re: Ignition switch diy
« Reply #9 on: December 11, 2014, 08:46:38 AM »
Are you replacing the lock cylinder (and key) itself, or just the actual ignition switch that's worn out? Replacement of the actual switch tends to be a lot simpler (unless it's a Volkswagen). It's definitely DIY-able (even if it's a Volkswagen; it would just take longer). The part is usually ~$10-60 depending on the car.

Ashyukun

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 270
Re: Ignition switch diy
« Reply #10 on: December 11, 2014, 09:40:56 AM »
Looking the parts up on Rock Auto, a new lock cylinder is a bit over $100, and a new starter switch is about $50. Which needs to be replaced will depend on the problem you're having. On my parents' Intrigue (which Rock Auto confirms uses the same ignition key module with the passkey as the Chevy Classic we're discussing), the ignition key just got progressively harder to get to turn- the tumblers were having issues and wearing out so you had to jiggle the keys JUST right to get it to turn, and it eventually got to the point where it was essentially impossible to use- this required replacing the ignition lock cylinder. If the key would have turned but nothing happened,then I'd be oncerned about the switch itself since it would seem to indicate that the electrical connections were not being made.

Murse

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 422
Re: Ignition switch diy
« Reply #11 on: December 11, 2014, 12:43:13 PM »
The problem does seem to be electrical rather than difficulty turning the key. It kept turning off, even while cruising at 40mph and I would have to go back to park to restart it. I am curious, is it possible that them taking it apart and looking at it may of properly aligned it or removed dust or something making the connection better? Since taking it in for the diagnoses it has had no problems (yet.) I was rear ended a few months prior to this problem arising, I wonder if it may of been knocked loose.

svi

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 17
Re: Ignition switch diy
« Reply #12 on: December 11, 2014, 01:30:02 PM »
The car turning itself off while driving is extremely dangerous. This car seems to fall into the list of cars affected by the gm ignition switch recall. you need to fix this asap. Go to a reputable chevy dealership, this should be free for you.

Murse

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 422
Re: Ignition switch diy
« Reply #13 on: December 11, 2014, 02:02:07 PM »
The car turning itself off while driving is extremely dangerous. This car seems to fall into the list of cars affected by the gm ignition switch recall. you need to fix this asap. Go to a reputable chevy dealership, this should be free for you.

How can I verify this? Online I can find that chevy malibu's had a recall but not the "chevy Malibu classic" or chevy "classic"

svi

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 17
Re: Ignition switch diy
« Reply #14 on: December 11, 2014, 02:16:51 PM »
grab your VIN and call the phone listed under gmignitionupdate.com or go to a GM dealership and describe your symptoms (especially the fact that the car turns itself off while you are on the road).

Murse

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 422
Re: Ignition switch diy
« Reply #15 on: December 11, 2014, 02:42:28 PM »
UNINTENDED IGNITION KEY ROTATION

Recall Description:

General Motors has decided that a defect which relates to motor vehicle safety exists in 2000-2005 MY Chevrolet Impala and Monte Carlo, 1997-2005 MY Chevrolet Malibu, 1999-2004 MY Oldsmobile Alero, 1998-2002 MY Oldsmobile Intrigue, 1999-2005 MY Pontiac Grand Am, and 2004-2008 MY Pontiac Grand Prix vehicles. If the key ring is carrying added weight and the vehicle goes off road or experiences some other jarring event, it may unintentionally move the key away from the run position. If this occurs, engine power, power steering and power braking may be affected, increasing the risk of a crash.

Safety Risk Description:

The timing of the key movement out of the run position, relative to the activation of the sensing algorithm of the crash event, may result in the airbags not deploying, increasing the potential for occupant injury in certain kinds of crashes. Until the recall has been performed, it is very important that customers remove all items from their key ring, leaving only the vehicle key. The key fob (if applicable), should also be removed from the key ring.

Repair Description:

Dealers are to install two key rings and an insert in the key slot or a cover over the key head on all ignition keys, free of charge.

Murse

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 422
Re: Ignition switch diy
« Reply #16 on: December 11, 2014, 02:45:11 PM »
Now, I had a diagnosis done, and spoke with the shop that did it and they said that this was not my cars problem, my cars problem was with the electrical portion of my ignition switch. I scheduled to get the recall fixed but I am unsure if I should wait and see if the problem persists or just get it replaced.

svi

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 17
Re: Ignition switch diy
« Reply #17 on: December 11, 2014, 03:00:27 PM »
Get the recall done. It may well address the issue since they will replace both the ignition switch and the lock cylinder.

Ashyukun

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 270
Re: Ignition switch diy
« Reply #18 on: December 12, 2014, 07:41:47 AM »
I agree with svi wholeheartedly- get the recall done first and see whether that makes a difference. It's possible it won't, be it's quite likely it will and will save you a good bit of money and effort. Recalls are usually FREE, so there's really no reason NOT to do it first.

Spork

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5759
    • Spork In The Eye
Re: Ignition switch diy
« Reply #19 on: December 12, 2014, 07:48:16 AM »
The problem does seem to be electrical rather than difficulty turning the key. It kept turning off, even while cruising at 40mph and I would have to go back to park to restart it. I am curious, is it possible that them taking it apart and looking at it may of properly aligned it or removed dust or something making the connection better? Since taking it in for the diagnoses it has had no problems (yet.) I was rear ended a few months prior to this problem arising, I wonder if it may of been knocked loose.

I'll throw out a personal experience that is quite probably totally unrelated. I had this happen in a Ford truck and the problem was the main computer board (in this case, part of the instrument cluster). Mine was triggering some theft mode. The manual clearly states that it is 100% impossible for this to happen after the car is started. Turns out, they were wrong.
Some will sell their dreams for small desires
Or lose the race to rats
Get caught in ticking traps
And start to dream of somewhere
To relax their restless flight