Author Topic: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement? (Read 53695 times)

TrulyStashin

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Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« on: November 15, 2013, 08:12:16 PM »
The 1100 square feet of tile in my basement is 2% asbestos. It's ugly and dated. I need to encapsulate it an am considering the following options:

1) epoxy floor painted right over the tile (estimated cost $1,000)
2) porcelain 12 x 12 tile over the 9 x 9 asbestos tile (which is still strongly adhered). Given the large size of the floor, this would require an underlayment to prevent cracked tiles over time. (estimated cost $2800 - $3000)
3) a mix of tile and carpet (estimated cost $2500 - $2800)
4) floating laminate "wood" floor (estimated cost $2500)
5) floating vinyl planks (example: Allure flooring at Home Depot) (estimated cost $2300)

The epoxy is the clear winner on price. Has anyone done this? There are plenty of website tutorials on doing an epoxy floor in the garage, but not over vinyl asbestos tile. I've found a few posts on DIY home improvement sites, but I'm unconvinced.

Things to consider: 1) It's subgrade and though the basement is dry, it is still a basement. 2) I'm going to have a tenant in the space so an inexpensive floor (e.g. Allure vinyl planks) might be quickly ruined by furniture dragged over it or some such carelessness. 3) this is part of a larger renovation which is about 75% DIY and so a less-intense floor replacement is very appealing. The thought of tiling and grouting 1100 square feet makes me cranky.

What sayest thou??
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monarda

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2013, 09:32:28 PM »
If you want the floating floor option to succeed, the floor really needs to be completely flat. If not, you need to spend some serious time with a floor leveling compound. We put in a laminate floor this summer, and when the subfloor was off by 1/4 inch out of total flatness, the laminate wouldn't interlock.

Epoxy floor painted over the tile will probably look like painted tiles. (=bad)

Do not put ceramic/porcelain tile over the vinyl/asbestos tile. You're just asking for the tiles and the grout to crack. Check out the john bridge tile forums for more info if you don't believe this is a bad idea.
When we had vinyl asbestos tile in our basement, we removed them. They seemed strongly adhered at first, but in actuality, they popped right off with a wonder bar. One sharp rap from one side was all that was needed per tile. Got the whole thing taken up in under an hour. The black adhesive (known as 'cutback' ) that's most likely gluing the tiles on actually also likely has asbestos in it. We scraped off the lumpiest parts of the cutback, then we installed ceramic tiles over the top of the cutback with a modified thinset mortar. Part of the area (also a basement), we installed an inexpensive berber carpet remnant, right over the asbestos tile. We did the install ourselves, and bought the tile on CL.

Is your basement dry enough to carpet all of it? Or carpet most of it and remove the vinyl and tile the rest (or install laminate on part?).

You might have posted this in your other thread, but do you have this basement safe and legal for rental, with two exits? Might mean an egress window, or two stairways? We had a lot of trouble with previous tenants having their teenager live down in the basement (in the photos). Strictly against fire code.
« Last Edit: December 29, 2013, 10:25:42 PM by monarda »

Argyle

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2013, 11:53:18 PM »
This sounds like an issue where the real cost-effective solution is going to be the one that doesn't go wrong and have to be done over again. You might also pose the question on GardenWeb's Home Forums (http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/), where there seems to be an expert for every question.

TrulyStashin

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2013, 06:20:35 AM »
Thanks. The 36 x 42 casement egress window (Craigslist, $25.00!) for the bedroom is going in next week. Once that is done, there will be two exits.

I had the ceiling tile, floor tile and mastic tested and fortunately only the floor tile has asbestos in it and only 2%. The mastic does not have asbestos. I've considered taking the floor up as the best solution and will give that some more thought. With the proper protective gear and due care not to break the tiles it is very possible. There is a landfill near us that accepts asbestos waste. I don't care for the idea of leaving asbestos tiles, lurking, under another floor. I'd rather know they were gone.

The floor is very level -- my house was very well built. The carpenter who framed in the laundry room was amazed at how square and level all the corners and lines are. I would not do the whole floor in carpet because of the fireplace and the French Door entry (soot & dirt, respectively) but a mix of carpet and tile would work.
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paddedhat

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2013, 08:33:02 AM »
you sound obviously well read with regard to the issues here. As you might imagine, DIY abatement is a bit of a hot topic. My first thought is, "are you really protecting your own health, and the heath of current and future occupants, by doing this yourself?" Bit of a range of ideas in what defines best practice here. I have worked many public jobs ( schools, government buildings, etc) where abatement of floor tile involved the standard sealing and negative pressurization of the work area, and filtered evacuation of the discharge air, PPE, air quality testing, etc... OTOH, one poster is correct, in residential work it is pretty typical to pop the tiles off the floor and sent them off to the dump. Doesn't mean that it's safe, or healthy, but it's pretty much SOP.

In this case, I would probably disturb the existing floor as little as possible, and go with a commercial grade level loop carpet in most areas, with small areas of tile where needed. This would avoid the need for significant removal of tile, and give you a rugged floor for rental use. JMHE, Laminates are good looking plastic covered pictures of real floor attached to fragile, paper board that turns to mush when wet. It damages easily, it clicks when you walk on it, it looks fake, and it's scrap. I hate the stuff. Doesn't matter if it is $.69 a foot stuff from the odd lot outlet, or $7.00 a foot, with a thin layer of real wood over the paperboard, it's all shit. The whole luxury vinyl plank craze is also a scam. I just did the majority of our new home with a click lock LVT. By the time the installers were sweeping up, I knew it wasn't going to be down long. Within a few weeks the manufacture had reviewed the claim, agreed that it was awash with defects, and paid to have it removed.

I have a good friend in the flooring business. two stores, several install crews out every day, and a few hundred thousand in DIY sales a year. He will tell you that the trend toward all the vinyl plank stuff is the one thing that keeps him up at night. He refuses to keep samples of the click lock products out on the floor. Seven years of trying different versions of the stuff and nothing but problems. As for the peel and press installations, or pre-taped edges, it's been a real toss up. Whole pallets of defective product from big brand names, and other issues.

Commercial level loop carpet in rentals is underappreciated. It lasts for years in places like hospital hallways, and offices. It is inexpensive and doesn't look bad if you find a decent color and pattern. If you really want a bomb proof install over the old tile take a look at commercial carpet squares. They are glued down with a removable adhesive, and when one becomes damaged or stained beyond cleaning, you grab it with a pliers, peel it up, and replace it. Good luck

Daleth

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2013, 09:52:58 AM »
We used Allure in a rental. It looks great and went in easily. It seems to be holding up pretty well despite a dog living there (a literal dog--I'm not insulting the tenant, haha), and here's some CRUCIAL information for you: our subfloor was absolute crap, not flat, irregular. And yet the floor went in just fine.

Also, as you probably know, Allure is basically 100% vinyl--it's extremely water resistant; each piece has these flaps or lips or whatever the word is that you use to stick the tiles to each other, and the flaps/lips are vinyl too, so the whole floor is flexible (i.e. FORGIVING of imperfect subfloors and not at all prone to cracking) and very water resistant.

I would feel good about putting Allure over asbestos in a basement, because the combination of vinyl, overlapping lips linking all the tiles together and adhesive seems like a pretty effective encapsulator.

Here's why I would not do the other options:
- Porcelain or similar tile: the grout is prone to cracking; the work/expense involved in creating a perfect subfloor is significant; and THIS IS A BASEMENT, i.e., more prone to damp or even flooding than other floors. Do you really want your plywood subfloor to get damp or wet? Water can come up from below, seep in sideways through your foundation or get in through the cracked grout.

- Carpet: this doesn't effectively encapsulate the asbestos because it's porous. Also, see above discussion of damp/flooding.

- Floating anything: see above discussion of the prep work and dampness issues with a subfloor.

- Epoxy: likely to look terrible.

My choices would be either Allure or sheet vinyl (or sheet marmoleum if you want to be green/not deal with potential vinyl offgassing, but marmoleum is more expensive). I definitely wouldn't use regular vinyl tiles because they don't have the overlapping flaps/lips that Allure does, so they wouldn't encapsulate the asbestos nearly as well.
« Last Edit: November 17, 2013, 10:01:51 AM by Daleth »

Argyle

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2013, 11:20:14 AM »
If you didn't have asbestos, would you make a different choice? How long are you planning to own the house?

If you're planning to own the house for the very long term, like for the rest of your life, I'd have the asbestos removed, by a professional whose reputation you've checked out thoroughly. This is a case where safety trumps frugality. I know people take shortcuts with asbestos and lead and all that, but really, do you want asbestos fibers floating around your house? Even apart from the health hazards (which are not negligible), there are liability issues, plus if you do want to sell the place, someone canny is going to want to know the background and whether they have to worry about asbestos fibers floating around the house. I have a friend who does this for a living and can tell you about the very real health consequences that can come from taking the shortcuts. And then once the asbestos is out, you can choose without that consideration.

If you're only there for the short term, I agree with the vinyl or marmoleum. I personally wouldn't put carpet of any sort in a basement, after my experiences with supposedly dry basements.

monarda

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #7 on: November 17, 2013, 11:32:31 AM »
All true and good precautions for friable asbestos.
The floor tiles are not friable asbestos.

http://solidwasteservices.net/PDF/asbestos.pdf

Argyle

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #8 on: November 17, 2013, 11:49:27 AM »
If he tries to remove the floor, it's definitely friable. If he leaves it in place, it's not friable -- unless it's damaged by something like flooding (if the flooding requires the subsequent removal of flooring), alterations to the floor, damage to the floor, etc. So it's not friable if it stays undamaged, intact, and in place. If he's just there for the short term, that will probably take care of it. If it's going to be a longterm home, it might be a good idea to take care of it now, before whatever thing happens where it has to be removed under more difficult conditions.

monarda

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #9 on: November 17, 2013, 12:26:21 PM »
I disagree. The floor is not "definitely friable".
90% of my tiles popped off whole. The remainder broke in half. Not a dusty project.

That above document says (grammar makes it unclear) that the "paper-backed" tiles are friable should be left in place. The papery backing will easily give off fibers into the air. Not the tile itself. Here is a more clearly written document
http://deq.state.or.us/aq/asbestos/docs/Asbflr.pdf

Of course the OP shouldn't remove the floor if uncomfortable with the idea. But there's a lot of overblown hype related to VAT.

Allure sounds like a good solution, since it's flexible and won't be destroyed by moisture. I agree with those who said the laminate is a bad idea. If the basement ever gets wet, the floor is toast. We tore some out of a kitchen that got destroyed from a dishwasher leak. Last summer, we did put some in a bedroom on the second floor, which will remain dry.



worms

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #10 on: November 17, 2013, 02:04:48 PM »
Is covering with a concrete screed not a cheaper option than the epoxy and still acceptable as a means of encapsulating the asbestos?

Peony

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #11 on: November 17, 2013, 04:49:39 PM »
My BF used the vinyl planks (I think it was Allure -- not sure if it was a different one) in his rental house. We were both amazed at how nice they look. He chose a dark color with subtle wood-grain texture. They have only been in for a year, but so far, no problems. They were very easy to install, once he and his contractor friend got their groove going. I think the planks were forgiving of some imperfections in the floor. From what we learned while researching his choice, vinyl is much more durable (doesn't scratch, water won't hurt it) than the composite "wood" stuff that is being sold.

That said, the safety of the asbestos tile would not concern me, personally, if it were not crumbling. But I'm guessing it is dated and ugly, and that is something I'd want to fix.

Jack

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #12 on: November 17, 2013, 06:49:34 PM »
Is covering with a concrete screed not a cheaper option than the epoxy and still acceptable as a means of encapsulating the asbestos?

This was my thought, too. Encapsulate it with self-leveling concrete, then epoxy (or maybe stain, or polish) that.

monarda

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #13 on: November 17, 2013, 07:18:28 PM »
Jack, worms,

Interesting idea. Most flooring groups say this is a bad idea, but certain SLC manufacturers claim otherwise.

for example - http://floortechnologies.com/flooring_downloads/Level-Right_Brochure.pdf

I do get the idea that SLC is relatively expensive, and is not designed to be a final coat, but an underlayment for ceramic tile or other.

Jack

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #14 on: November 17, 2013, 07:27:19 PM »
Most flooring groups say this is a bad idea... SLC is relatively expensive, and is not designed to be a final coat

Never mind then.

TrulyStashin

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #15 on: November 18, 2013, 07:54:22 AM »
Thanks for the lively debate, and keep it coming please. This is exactly the dilemma that I've been wrestling with.

1) I've owned the house since 2004 and have no plans to sell anytime soon. Will likely rent the whole place in about 2 years (renting just the basement for now) and move somewhere smaller (empty nest in 2015).

2) The tiles are not considered friable unless I pulverize or sand them, which I won't do. The are 2 percent asbestos (I had them tested at a lab).

3) If the tiles come up, then removing or smoothing the mastic beneath the tiles is an additional consideration. 1100 sq feet of old mastic........... (not asbestos)

4) I like the idea of Allure because I can afford to do that now and if I have to drop back and punt in a few years then it will be pretty easy to remove. My biggest concern with it is that I wouldn't get even 2 or 3 years out of it. There are two positive comments on Allure flooring and one negative. Does anyone else have a comment on Allure or similar vinyl plank flooring?


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Greg

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #16 on: November 18, 2013, 09:31:13 AM »
I'm a design/build contractor and do mostly remodels and additions, with an emphasis on green construction. I wouldn't recommend the vinyl plank flooring to anyone. The problems are many-fold; the material is toxic to make, will off-gas and anyone with concerns like mine wouldn't want to rent the space. When it's time to replace it it's trash.

There are many things that can affect the self-adhesive strips that the vinyl plank floorings use, chemicals, heat, dust can all eventually find their way into the joint and cause adhesion problems.

Another option to look into is a fake tile product like Congoleum Dura Ceramic, if the existing tiles are well-adhered you could go over them with this type of glue-down tile.

Have you consulted with a flooring installer? Professional installers (I would look for someone familiar with the existing flooring type and also with things like Marmoleum) will be your best resource for advice that will likely be very sound. For free, or a small fee, a pro's advice could go a long way here.

ritchie70

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #17 on: November 18, 2013, 01:03:25 PM »
Commercial level loop carpet in rentals is underappreciated. It lasts for years in places like hospital hallways, and offices. It is inexpensive and doesn't look bad if you find a decent color and pattern. If you really want a bomb proof install over the old tile take a look at commercial carpet squares. They are glued down with a removable adhesive, and when one becomes damaged or stained beyond cleaning, you grab it with a pliers, peel it up, and replace it. Good luck

I have 24" carpet tiles in my basement on the bare concrete. I didn't use adhesive - they're held down with occasional pieces of double-stick carpet tape or double-stick gaffer's tape depending on which part of the basement, but the tiles are heavy enough that they mostly hold themselves. They're certainly heavier than a normal upright vacuum can lift, although I can lift them with a shop vac.

To me this is the perfect basement floor covering if your basement is basically dry, and you could put it over the existing tiles. It's easy to install - all you need is some tape, a straight-edge, a utility knife, and a bunch of extra blades.

If it gets wet, you carry it outside and lay it in the sun for a few days then put it back down. I actually had to do this in half my basement about 9 months ago, and although it wasn't fun, it was basically zero cost except another roll of tape.

It looks decent, it absorbs some sound, and if there's a stain, you just pull a spare tile out and change it. Just figure out how much extra you need to support the amount of patching replacement you think you'll need and buy it all up front.

Johnny Aloha

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #18 on: November 18, 2013, 01:41:52 PM »
Does anyone else have a comment on Allure or similar vinyl plank flooring?

We used Allure before selling a house in 2009. It was easy to install, but I can't comment on the durability since we don't live there anymore. If I remember correctly, it had a lifetime residential warranty (even if its 25 years, that's still pretty good).

I did quite a bit of research before installing it and found that most of the reviews were positive. Seems like people either love it or hate it.

In your situation, I would install the Allure right over the asbestos tile and would not consider carpet, porcelain tile, etc. As long as your tenants aren't walking around in ice skates, I think it's a reasonbably priced durable product that is easy to install over the existing flooring.

Peony

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #19 on: November 18, 2013, 04:20:26 PM »
I totally hear Greg on the environmental issues and the aesthetic ones. We avoid vinyl for those exact reasons and never would have used it in the rental except that after doing one of his units' floors with real wood, which is what he really wanted to use everywhere, my BF realized he could not afford to go that route and had to just do the least-offensive cheap thing. So, Allure. And once I saw it laid down, I was pleasantly surprised. The planks, IMO, are a lot nicer than the sheet stuff, and we thought the dark color appeared less obviously fake than the lighter. Throw a pretty rug over it and it could pass for wood. Also, we noticed no smell. We did *not* use the adhesive kind but just the interlocking planks.

TrulyStashin

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #20 on: November 19, 2013, 07:13:43 AM »
I've been researching the vinyl plank flooring and whether it impairs indoor air quality very much depends on the brand. Shaw's "Quiet Cover" is FloorScore certified for indoor air quality/ low VOC's; contributes to LEED certification (score MR4, EQ 4.3); and contains 72% recycled content. They have other, similar products with equally high quality, sustainable credentials. I've found some Shaw flooring that I like for $2.29 per sq foot. With a DIY-installation, that's a big win.

Right now, I'm thinking to do a blend of the Shaw vinyl planking and carpet squares, which will break up the large expanse of open floor, be affordable, and environmentally low-impact with low VOC's. I'm going to a flooring store later today to look at the Shaw line and talk to the sales reps. I'll report back whatever I learn.
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Daleth

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #21 on: November 19, 2013, 12:49:41 PM »
Have you considered putting epoxy down where the carpet squares are going to go? The carpet squares just are not even remotely going to encapsulate the asbestos.

TrulyStashin

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #22 on: November 19, 2013, 02:57:15 PM »
Sticker shock.

A flooring contractor just left. The vinyl plank click-lock floating flooring from Earthwerks ("Linkwerks") is going to run around $4,000 DIY and closer to $5500.00 installed. Yeesh. I like it. It has a solid, heavy feel to it with a 25 year warranty, but daaaammmnnnnnn that is pricey.

He also had the Shaw product that is $2.29 a sq foot and glues down. It was okay. Not as thick or heavy but then you get what you pay for. I'm going to go look at Shaw's click-lock product later but it is likely out of my price range too.

I checked with four different concrete contractors and all four said "can't do a skim coat over VAT. It won't adhere and will crack." The only way that concrete would work is if I added about 2" of concrete on top of the VAT which of course isn't a good option.

Given price considerations, options are now dwindling to:

1) leave it and cover it in large remnants; hope tenant doesn't object; new floor next year or in 2015
2) epoxy (Sherwin Williams has a terrazo-look epoxy that I need to check into)
3) Less expensive vinyl floor such as Shaw's New Market at $2.29 sq ft.




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TrulyStashin

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #23 on: November 19, 2013, 03:05:31 PM »
Have you considered putting epoxy down where the carpet squares are going to go? The carpet squares just are not even remotely going to encapsulate the asbestos.

The asbestos in inert and encapsulated in the tiles. Anything covering the tile also contains the asbestos. If the tile wasn't ugly, dull, and dated I'd leave it. It is tough as iron. Asbestos is only released if the tiles are sanded or pulverized. I could do wall-to-wall carpet or carpet squares in the whole basement and it would be fine but with an entry door, a fireplace, and a kitchen all in the space where the carpet would go, this seems like a bad idea.

Plus, the carpet squares are really pricey. So that option is out, anyway.
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TrulyStashin

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #24 on: November 19, 2013, 04:00:47 PM »
Solution found. I am going to paint the floor and add rugs/ carpet remnants in complementary colors. Total cost estimated $175.00 - $250.00 depending on whether I do one coat or two.

It won't last forever but it should get me two or three years of use. During that time, I'll set aside some money for a permanent solution. Hopefully, that'll be the tenant's money!

I stopped into Sherwin Williams and asked about epoxy. A true epoxy requires removal of the tile, so that's no good. The garage floor "epoxy" that Depot, Lowes, and SW sell is not a true epoxy and it is a pain to work with. But they have a Porch & Floor Paint that dries to a satin finish, is self-priming, and comes in any color from their color deck. The cost is $53 per gallon and I'll need about 3 gallons to do the whole floor with one coat. I already scored one huge carpet remnant from CL for $65.00. I may add a one or two more.

That'll do. I'll be sure to post pictures.
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slf

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #25 on: November 20, 2013, 06:25:03 AM »
An aside question: Where do you get the tile tested to see if it has Asbestos?

I have tiles in my unfinished basement that are questionable, but I don't know how to tell if it has asbestos. (my house was built in the 1050s)

I'm not planning to finish my basement - I only use it for storage, laundry and an occasional craft/workshop area. So functionality wise the only thing I might do is put a throw rug down for comfort where I stand. If they do have asbestos is it worth doing anything about?

The tiles are in good shape except the edge ones (they don't cover the entire floor) The edge ones may break off a little piece now and then if I hit the edge on something.

lithy

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #26 on: November 20, 2013, 06:52:19 AM »
An aside question: Where do you get the tile tested to see if it has Asbestos?

I have tiles in my unfinished basement that are questionable, but I don't know how to tell if it has asbestos. (my house was built in the 1050s)

I'm not planning to finish my basement - I only use it for storage, laundry and an occasional craft/workshop area. So functionality wise the only thing I might do is put a throw rug down for comfort where I stand. If they do have asbestos is it worth doing anything about?

The tiles are in good shape except the edge ones (they don't cover the entire floor) The edge ones may break off a little piece now and then if I hit the edge on something.

I purchased a house built in 1960 with a clearly removed tile floor in the basement with some glue still down. From the size of the tiles (9x9), I was told they were asbestos tiles.

So all asbestos tiles are 9x9, although I'm not positive that all 9x9 tiles contain asbestos.

Just a bit of information, in case yours are 6x6 or 12x12 or something else, as long as they aren't 9x9, you shouldn't have anything to worry about.

TrulyStashin

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #27 on: November 20, 2013, 07:34:21 AM »
An aside question: Where do you get the tile tested to see if it has Asbestos?

I have tiles in my unfinished basement that are questionable, but I don't know how to tell if it has asbestos. (my house was built in the 1050s)

I'm not planning to finish my basement - I only use it for storage, laundry and an occasional craft/workshop area. So functionality wise the only thing I might do is put a throw rug down for comfort where I stand. If they do have asbestos is it worth doing anything about?

The tiles are in good shape except the edge ones (they don't cover the entire floor) The edge ones may break off a little piece now and then if I hit the edge on something.

I purchased a house built in 1960 with a clearly removed tile floor in the basement with some glue still down. From the size of the tiles (9x9), I was told they were asbestos tiles.

So all asbestos tiles are 9x9, although I'm not positive that all 9x9 tiles contain asbestos.

Just a bit of information, in case yours are 6x6 or 12x12 or something else, as long as they aren't 9x9, you shouldn't have anything to worry about.

You can likely find a lab in your area that will do the testing. It is not expensive. I tested the tile, the mastic adhesive, and the ceiling tile. Total cost = $27.00. Only the tile contains asbestos, thank goodness. Here's one helpful site http://mass.gov/lwd/labor-standards/massachusetts-workplace-safety-and-health-program/hazard-info/hib417.html.

The tiles are actually pretty wonderful products in many ways. My tiles are 50 years old and still strongly adhered and intact. They're fireproof, waterproof, dog-pee proof (ask me how I know THAT!), and take all kinds of abuse. My kids used to skateboard in the basement when they were younger. Honestly, if they weren't ugly, I'd love them. Given that your space is purely a utility room, I'd leave them there.
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Greg

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #28 on: November 20, 2013, 08:29:53 AM »
So all asbestos tiles are 9x9, although I'm not positive that all 9x9 tiles contain asbestos.

Just a bit of information, in case yours are 6x6 or 12x12 or something else, as long as they aren't 9x9, you shouldn't have anything to worry about.

Not true, many 12" tiles contain asbestos. But, unless you sand them or they're crumbling, or plan to remove them in a manner that will create dust, you needn't worry.

NinetyFour

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #29 on: November 20, 2013, 09:23:17 AM »
"my house was built in the 1050s"

Wow--not sure if asbestos was used in home construction at that time!! Do you have a moat? :)
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paddedhat

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #30 on: November 20, 2013, 01:40:23 PM »
The porch paint idea is going to fail. Not "might, or could fail", not "should hold out for a few years", it will look like shit, with traffic patterns worn through, in a few months. I have seen this attempted, for exactly the same reason you want to do it, and it doesn't work. You obviously can't sand the tile to de-gloss it properly, and the stuff is just too dense and slick to allow for acceptable adhesion. If you are really heading for the low budget end of things. Take a look at the imitation Dura-ceramic tile at home depot. ( specifically Trafficmaster Ceramica Shasta 12"x12") I did a few baths with it, dirt cheap, and looks great. I did it with grout and you would need to be a flooring professional, and on your knees examining it, to figure out that it wasn't $8 SQ. Ft ceramic tile. It was $.99 for 12" tile and it can be laid tight, with no grout lines. I would clean the floors with a super duty cleaner like TSP, then also use standard vinyl tile adhesive, even though it claims to be a peel and stick tile. For less that $1200 you will have a great looking floor.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2013, 03:46:06 PM by paddedhat »

paddedhat

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #31 on: November 20, 2013, 03:50:17 PM »
So all asbestos tiles are 9x9, although I'm not positive that all 9x9 tiles contain asbestos.

Just a bit of information, in case yours are 6x6 or 12x12 or something else, as long as they aren't 9x9, you shouldn't have anything to worry about.

Not true, many 12" tiles contain asbestos. But, unless you sand them or they're crumbling, or plan to remove them in a manner that will create dust, you needn't worry.

I too was under the totally false impression that there was no such thing as a 12" tile that contained asbestos. Not only are there plenty of products out there in that size that were manufactured with asbestos, they were being made into the late 1980s.

okashira

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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #32 on: November 21, 2013, 11:35:16 PM »
My kids used to skateboard in the basement when they were younger. Honestly, if they weren't ugly, I'd love them.

I lol'd
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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #33 on: December 28, 2013, 07:55:05 AM »
I bet you got the cheapie PLM asbestos test. Really, it is just a ballpark. They routinely measure high. I had a large volume of asbestos tests performed on various structures. By retesting with the more accurate "point count" method, more than 65% of the samples came back below 1%.

What's key about 1%? If it is below 1%, it's legally not Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) in the USA.

Even the EPA says to retest if the PLM comes back below 10% (though I've never seen anything over a 5% PLM come back with below 1% by point count.)
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Re: Solutions for Asbestos Tile Floor in Basement?
« Reply #34 on: December 29, 2013, 12:06:51 PM »
I ended up doing w2w carpet in the whole room and I'm very pleased. It's a huge improvement in the room and the total cost was $3k. The tiles are now safely covered. My basement is very dry and partially above-grade because of how the land rolls so I decided that my concerns about basement dampness were unfounded.

Before and after pics attached.
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